Friday, 27 October 2017

Print your own 3D stainless steel bridge



Researchers at the Imperial College London are working with a 3D printing company called MX3D to create the world’s largest 3D printed metal structure. The structure is a footbridge that will be installed in the Netherlands in late 2018. The bridge will cross the Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal in Amsterdam. Once open the bridge will be used by pedestrians and cyclists. The bridge will have a vast sensor network installed on it by structural engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, and statisticians working in The Alan Turing Institute-Lloyd’s Register Foundation program in data-centric engineering. All the sensors will be used to collect data on the bridge like strain, displacement, and vibration.


The sensors will also be able to measure environmental factors like air quality and temperature. Together all the sensors will allow the monitoring of the health of the bridge in real time and monitoring of how the bridge changes over time. The detailed sensor data will be used to create a digital twin of the bridge

The insights gleaned from the sensor array will be used in future 3D printed structures. The performance of the real bridge can be tested with the digital model and it will allow the bridge to be modified for safety if needed.

The scientists have announced that the data captured by the sensors on the bridge will be made open for research. MX3D has launched an open call that closes in February 2018 to get ideas for how to use the data it is collecting.





To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#3dprinting #StainlessSteelFacts

Source/read more:
https://www.slashgear.com/3d-printed-stainless-steel-bridge-to-be-installed-in-the-netherlands-24505189/

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_20-10-2017-16-21-38

Friday, 20 October 2017

Living green facades thanks to Stainless Steel mesh system



Leading garden wall and sustainable vertical garden specialist Fytogreen relies on cabling and stainless steel mesh systems from Tensile to support their green façades.

Fytogreen also developed a lightweight, mineral based soil for their roof gardens. For their vertical garden system, Fytogreen uses hydroponic foam with no soil particles to move or organics to decay. These ecologically sustainable vertical gardens allow plants capable of functioning within the design of the vertical garden system to live out their natural lifecycle.

For projects involving green facades, Fytogreen uses planter boxes specifically designed for the use of their lightweight soils or hydroponic panels supported by Tensile’s cabling and stainless steel mesh systems.

Pictured:
Salvo Property Group - Somerville - Victoria - Australia
203 planter boxes were pre-grown at Fytogreen’s nursery facility in Somerville for 9 months. The planting pallet comprised of 5 species with the aspect facing west and north.
Roof/Wall Size: 1 700.00m²


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#Fytogreen #StainlessSteelFacts



 

Source/read more:
http://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/tensile/tensile-s-cabling-and-stainless-steel-mesh-systems

Images and project details:
https://greenroofsaustralasia.com.au/projects/platinum-apartments-melbourne-fytogreen-australia

Friday, 13 October 2017

How You Can Save The Ocean One Drink at a Time



Plastic straws suck – literally and figuratively. Americans alone throw away 500 million plastic straws each day. To paint the picture: 500 million straws would fill more than 125 school buses every single day. That’s 46,400 school buses a year – and it doesn’t even count the rest of the world.

Most of these straws end up in our oceans and threaten marine life with injury or death through entanglement and ingestion. Worse, as straws break down into smaller and smaller pieces over time, their petroleum compounds leak toxins and slowly poison the waters, entering the food chain and endangering yet more sea life that never came into contact with the original straw.

Multiple campaigns aim to end plastic straw usage: Some cities are banning them altogether, like Seattle, which is set to ban all plastic straws and dining utensils by July 2018. Many restaurants have voluntarily already banned straws now, and there is even a social media hashtag, #StopSucking, used by celebrities and participants involved in the movement.

Some hotels have taken a stand against plastic straws, like all of the Six Senses resorts, including Six Senses Zighy Bay in Oman. And paper straws replaced plastic ones at Virtuoso’s annual luxury travel conference in Las Vegas this year.

Without a sustained effort, the amount of plastic in the ocean will outnumber fish by 2050. Once-beautiful reefs will be littered with pieces of plastic.

An alternative to these plastic straws are Stainless Steel straws. Durable and lightweight, Stainless Steel metal straws won’t corrode, rust or break.



To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#StopSucking #StainlessSteelFacts

Source/read more:
http://blog.virtuoso.com/tips-and-trends/how-you-can-save-the-ocean-one-drink-at-a-time/

Friday, 6 October 2017

Stainless Steel sculpture brings ‘light on the land’



The Light on the Land sculpture in New Plymouth was a collaboration between sculptor Howard Tuffery and Steve Scott from Rivet engineering.


The latest addition to New Plymouth's coastal walkway has won the engineering firm behind it an award - for the second time.

The $100,000 Light on the Land sculpture, near the Wind Wand, was made by Rivet Engineering and designed by Taranaki sculptor Howard Tuffery and has picked up the 2017 award for excellence & innovation in stainless steel fabrication.

Rivet won the same award in 2015 for its work on New Plymouth's Len Lye centre.

The award, which is given out by the New Zealand Stainless Steel Development Association, recognises the use of best practice principles in the design, fabrication, installation and successful use of stainless steel as well as using innovative new products and applications during fabrication and manufacturing.

The sculpture, which is around six metres long, 2.7m high and 2.5m in dep


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#HowardTuffery #StainlessSteelFacts

Source/read more:
https://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/97630686/creators-of-coastal-walkway-sculpture-reflect-on-national-award

Image by Chris Lord: https://www.facebook.com/ChrisLordPhotography/

Friday, 15 September 2017

The iPhone X - Stainless Steel at the cutting edge of technology


The new iPhone X packs more new stuff into any device since the original iPhone. It's the most complete redesign of the product ever and even offers a glimpse at what the iPhone might become when the world no longer wants smartphones. Of course, you probably won't buy one. Even if you can afford the super high price, getting your hands on an iPhone X in the next few months will be like hunting for the holy grail. Except in this case, the fancy one is the right answer.


First of all, the X looks like no other phone. It doesn't even look like an iPhone. On the front, it's screen head to foot, save for a small trapezoidal notch taken out of the top where Apple put selfie cameras and sensors. Otherwise, the bezel around the edge of the phone has been whittled to near-nonexistence and the home button disappeared—all screen and nothing else. The case is made of glass and surgical grade Stainless Steel.

When Apple launched the iPhone 10 years ago, the device was three things: a phone, an internet communicator, and an iPod. It's so many more now, to so many more people, but the iPhone X may be the first to be redesigned around a specific new purpose. The more dynamic screen, the vertically stacked cameras, the tiny bezels, the faster processor—all those things work together to make the iPhone X primarily about what's on the other side. You're not supposed to look at this device, but through it.


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:
 
http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#iPhonex  #iPhone10 #iPhone

Source/read more:
https://www.apple.com/uk/iphone-x/
https://www.wired.com/story/apple-iphone-x-iphone-8/

Monday, 19 June 2017

Watch a Plasma Cutter Make Quick Work of a Stainless Steel Bar at 30,000 FPS




Behold the awesome glory of the plasma cutter. These torches create electrically conductive jets of hot plasma that will cut through just about any conductive material, from steel to to brass. In the video below, the YouTube channel Warped Perception gives us a look at one of these at work on a bar of steel in slow motion.


The both educational and entertaining video exhibits how smooth and clean this tool can cut. At 30,000 FPS using a Phantom V2512 Camera, plasma cutting has never been so clear. The insanely hot cutter makes easy work of a bar of solid stainless steel as well as a bar of mild steel.

If you're going to equip your own garage with one of these viciously hot tools, make sure you have your faceplate, and make sure you know how to use it first.


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#PlasmaCutter  #StainlessSteelFacts

Source/read more:
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/tools/a26746/plasma-cutter-at-work/

Friday, 9 June 2017

Relax inside a giant golden Swedish Stainless Steel egg




Glimmering in solitude among the snow-laden landscape, stands a distinctive public sauna erected by artistic duo mats bigert and lars bergström. titled the solar egg, the installation stands at five meters high and four meters wide; the smooth and multi-faceted envelope or ‘shell’ wrapped in gold-plated stainless steel. a total of 69 separate pieces make up the egg’s exterior, reflecting glimpses of the swedish town of luossabacken in kiruna in the distance.


The project was commissioned by swedish developer riksbyggen to commemorate the growth of kiruna’s urban landscape which involves the relocation of entire city districts in response to ground subsidence caused by decades of iron ore mining. bigert & bergström’s response saw an oval-shaped sauna being created as a symbol of rebirth and as an homage to kiruna’s iron ore fields. a delicately-framed staircase reveals the entrance, an opening that appears to have cracked open to invite guests inside. the multi-faceted character is continued inside but instead, finished in pine wood. at the center, heat is emitted by a heart-shaped wood-fired burner.

Located in sweden’s northernmost town, the solar egg is a warm welcome and an intimate space of reflection for locals and visitors to take part in the unique sauna experience. created with the intention to be transportable, the faceted-structure can be de-constructed piece-by-piece and relocated to different locations within the city.

‘Saunas are places that fascinate. when riksbyggen asked us to interpret kiruna, we felt it was natural to explore a space that unites and encourages conversation,’ comments artists mats bigert and lars bergström. ‘saunas are sacrosanct places where you can discuss all manner of things - from the big to the small.’

The project continues bigert & bergström’s exploration with humanity’s relationship to climate, nature, energy and technology. on this occasion, the solar egg stands as a sculptural symbol that prompts thoughts of rebirth and an incubator that nurtures conversation and exchanges of ideas.

Consisting of 69 separate pieces, the installation can be taken down and moved to different locations

Solar Egg by Bigert & Bergström from designboom on Vimeo.


To get in touch about your next Stainless Steel project visit:

http://www.dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

Phone us on: 01159 255 927
Or Email: enquiries@dsmstainlessproducts.co.uk

#riksbyggen  #StainlessSteelFacts

Source/read more:
all images © jean-baptiste béranger
http://www.designboom.com/design/bigert-bergstrom-solar-egg-sauna-kiruna-sweden-05-09-2017/